SiliconFilter

SiliconMorning: The SOPA Blackout Edition (1/18)

/

Good morning. Chances are, there won't be a massive amount of tech news today, as the SOPA/PIPA blackouts will preempt most companies from making any major announcements today. The last few hours of Tuesday were already filled with SOPA news, as more and more companies announced their support for the protests.

Like what you read here? Sign up using the form on the right of this text to receive these updates in your mailbox every morning before they go online.

Top News: The SOPA Blackouts

Mozilla strike sopa

Wikipedia, Craigslist, Mozilla, Google and others black out their sites (or at least their logos): Wikipedia took the initiative early on and many others followed today. While Wikipedia is one of the few major sites that have decided to completely shut down, others, like Google, have just blacked out their logos and are using this as an opportunity to educate their users about SOPA. (WSJ, CNET)

Noteworthy statements:

More News

Google: "These bills would make it easier to sue law-abiding U.S. companies. Law-abiding payment processors and Internet advertising services can be subject to these private rights of action. SOPA and PIPA would also create harmful (and uncertain) technology mandates on U.S. Internet companies, as federal judges second-guess technological measures used by these companies to stop bad actors, and potentially impose inconsistent injunctions on them."(Google)

Mozilla: "While we generally support the end goal of the legislation – to limit online piracy of legitimate content – we believe that both PIPA and SOPA, in their current drafts, have serious flaws in the proposed implementation of the legislation. Among them is the requirement for online service and content providers to police the system. This would create an undue burden on businesses that were not designed for this purpose, would require more lawyers to be involved, and would extend the hand of government much deeper into these organizations." (Mozilla)

Microsoft: "We oppose the passage of the SOPA bill as currently drafted. We think the White House statement points in a constructive way to  problems with the current legislation, the need to fix them, and the opportunity for people on all sides to talk together about a better path forward.” (Bloomberg)

MPAA Chairman and CEO Chris Dodd: "It is an irresponsible response and a disservice to people who rely on them for information and use their services. It is also an abuse of power given the freedoms these companies enjoy in the marketplace today. It’s a dangerous and troubling development when the platforms that serve as gateways to information intentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests." (MPAA)

More News

Jerry Yang leaves Yahoo: Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang left the company today. While not completely unexpected, his departure came rather suddenly. He leaves an ailing company behind, though his departure may make room for some new breath in the company. Others board members will likely leave soon as well. (Yahoo, AllThingsD)

Facebook isn't just an echo chamber: A study by Facebook's own research team shows that, in contrast to popular opinion, Facebook users get exposed to a more diverse set of information than thought. The echo chamber effect is dampened by the fact that users tend to have a relatively large number of distant friends on the service that often represent different belief systems. (Facebook)

iPhone 4S Now Ships Sooner: U.S. consumers now only have to wait 3-5 days to get their iPhones, as Apple has either managed to produce more phones or as demand has slowed to the point where it's on par with supply. (Electronista)

New Smartphone Adopters buy more iPhones: "Among recent acquirers, meaning those who said they got a new device within the past three months, 44.5 percent of those surveyed in December said they chose an iPhone, compared to just 25.1 percent in October. Furthermore, 57 percent of new iPhone owners surveyed in December said they got an iPhone 4S." (Nielsen)

Google launches its annual Doodle4Google contest: Do you have a kid in your family? Here is their chance to draw one of Google's iconic doodles and win a $30,000 scholarship, too. (Google)

Worth a Look

Here is a very cool visualization of Twitter trends related to the current U.S. election cycle. (Hotspots.io)

And here is a nice collection of data about the Internet in 2011. (Pingdom)

Like what you read here? Sign up using the form below to receive these updates in your mailbox every morning before they go online.



11:38 pm


SiliconMorning: a Facebook IPO, a Cranky Rupert Murdoch and a Security Breach at Zappos(1/16)

/

It's not every day that a major media tycoon like Rupert Murdoch takes to his bully pulpit on Twitter to accuse Google of streaming pirated videos. Rupert Murdoch did just that over the weekend, presenting us with a series of misguided and misinformed tweets. Google, of course, was not amused.

Otherwise, the news was relatively quiet this weekend, though there were a number of security breaches at major companies and a discussion about how the iPhone's mute button should work kept the pundits occupied.

Top News

Murdoch tycoon

Rupert Murdoch: Google is a "Piracy Leader": Rupert Murdoch, the aging News Corp. chairman, isn't a big fan of Google. Taking to Twitter, Murdoch argued this weekend that the search engine needs to stop streaming pirated movies and give up its position as a "piracy leader." (Reuters, Techmeme)

The Facebook IPO is coming soon: Queen of scoops Kara Swisher reports that Facebook plans to IPO by the end of May. To do so, the company will have to file its paperwork with the SEC within the next month. Facebook will likely opt for a traditional IPO and not follow in Google's footsteps. (AllThingsD)

Google and Facebook fighting back against censorship demands in India: "The big threat for the companies at the moment is a lawsuit in a New Delhi trial court, which seeks to hold them and several other websites criminally liable for not censoring online content, including material that mocks or criticizes religious and political figures." (WSJ)

Security breaches at Zappos and CoverItLive: Two security breaches this weekend – one at Zappos, where customer's email and billing addresses, the last four digits of their credit card numbers and encrypted passwords were stolen. At live blogging platform CoverItLive, hackers also gained access to the company's network, but the extend of the damage is not clear yet. (TechCrunch, PC Mag)

Cloud

Windows on the Amazon cloud: Amazon has added Windows Server 2008 RC2 to its free tier for Amazon Web Services. Hackers – or more likely large businesses who run their apps on Windows Server – can now take a step into the Amazon cloud for free and see if they want to dive in deeper. (Amazon)

See Also

The marimba of shame: The conductor of the New York Philharmonic interrupted a performance this weekend after an iPhone's alarm went off in the front row. The culprit, apparently, muted his phone, but had mistakenly set his alarm to go off during the show. (NYTimes)



9:05 am


SiliconMorning: Reactions to Search, Plus Your World, Slow PC Sales, Cut the Rope (1/11)

/

Even though CES remains in full swing in Vegas, Google monopolized the attention of the tech news world on Tuesday with the announcement of its updated personalized search algorithm. The reactions so far have been relatively negative, as many have the impression that Google is just trying to push Google+ with this update. Google vehemently denies that it is favoring its own social network in its new "personal results," but Twitter and others have already complained to Google about this change and there has also been talk of Google abusing its legal monopoly by making this change. Very little has been said about whether this is actually improving the search experience for Google's users. Expect to hear some of that today.

Reactions to Google's Search Updates

Search, Plus Your World: Google's official announcement of these new features: "Search is pretty amazing at finding that one needle in a haystack of billions of webpages, images, videos, news and much more. But clearly, that isn’t enough. You should also be able to find your own stuff on the web, the people you know and things they’ve shared with you, as well as the people you don’t know but might want to… all from one search box." (Google blog)

Twitter: "As we’ve seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter; as a result, Twitter accounts and Tweets are often the most relevant results. 
We’re concerned that as a result of Google’s changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone. We think that’s bad for people, publishers, news organizations and Twitter users." (AllThingsD)

MG Siegler: "How on Earth is Google going to avoid antitrust inquiries with their new Search+ features announced today? If Facebook, Twitter, etc, have any decent presence in DC, the ball began rolling a few hours ago.
This is the type of case that Senators die for. Google wrapped it in a bow and placed it in one of their laps." (Parislemon)

The Atlantic/Alex Madrigal: "The new service, which Google calls 'Search Plus Your World,' shows both the power of integrating a social network with a search engine and the difficulty of executing on the two missions that Google has laid out for itself. What's best for Google Search might not be best for Google Plus and vice versa. And in trying to maximize both technologies' potential, Google might find itself hurting its core search tool."

Google's chairman Eric Schmidt: "I’m not going to talk about specifics." Schmidt argues that Google is not giving preferential treatment to its own service. It would give Twitter and Facebook the same treatment, if only they would give Google full access to their index.  (Marketing Land, Parislemon)

Other News

Microsoft says PC sales were slower than expected in Q4: The flooding in Thailand didn't just hurt the hard drive industry, but also the PC industry as a whole. Microsoft expect sales fell about 1% in Q4 and many analysts expect an even stronger decline in sales. Intel had already cut its revenue forecast for Q4 by about $1 billion last month. (Bloomberg)

Facebook rolls ads into the news feed: Between 2006 and 2009, Facebook featured some ads in its newsfeed, but then discontinued this program. Now these ads are back and marked as "featured."For the time being, you will not see more than one featured story per day. (FacebookTechCrunch)

300 Foxconn workers threaten suicide: According to some reports, 300 Foxconn workers in Wuhan threatened to kill themselvers on Jan. 2. The workers supposedly asked for a raise but were ony given the option to quit or continue to work for the same payment. The mayor of the town supposedly intervened and persuaded the protestors to abandon their plan. Note that this story is hard to verify. (Want China Times)

Amazon launches dedicated iPad Kindle store: No more fiddling around with Amazon's regular web interface if you want to buy a book for the Kindle App. It's web-based but feels very fluid and native. Since Apple doesn't allow Amazon to feature a store in its iPad app without paying royalties to Apple, this is probably the best solution for iPad owners. (9to5Mac)

Slower Firefox updates for more conservative users: Firefox users in the enterprise have been complaining about the fast release cycle the browser's developers adopted last year. Now, Firefox will, similar to Ubuntu, also release one version every 30 weeks that it will support for 42 week. (CNET)

New Ultrabook-like Chromebooks and a desktop Chromebox are coming: Samsung is giving its one and only Chromebook with a faster processor (up from an Atom to a Celeron), though the rest of the internals won't change much. Samsung is also launching a desktop model with support for dual screens. The new models will be available in April. Pricing will remain the same ($399 Wifi, $449 3G). (Engadget)

Distraction-free reading service Readability is now free, donations welcome: Instapaper competitor Readability has decided to give its free users full access to all of its features. You can still choose to donate to the service, which then passes the money on to authors whose articles are read through its software. Donations start at $5. (Readability)

For Fun

Cut the Rope in your browser and in HTML5: Love Cut the Rope on your phone? You can now play it on your browser – just make sure it's a modern version of Chrome, FF or IE. (Cut the Rope)

Best of Today (1/11) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



11:58 pm


SiliconMorning: A More Personalized Google Search, Kinect for PC, Stronger Glass (1/9)

/

As expected, the first day of CES brought a slew of news. Microsoft's keynote was mostly forgettable, except for the announcement of a launch date for the Kinect for PC (Feb. 1st). Other vendors made better use of their time in the spotlight, however. Google, however, managed to re-capture the limelight this morning by announcing its new, highly personalized "Google Plus Your World" search algorithm – the most significant change to its search product in quite a while.

Sign up here:

Get this newsletter in your mailbox every morning. Just leave your email address in the form below:


Here are some of the most important stories to come out of CES and beyond.

Top News

Google, Plus Your World: Google's search results are now more personalized based on your personal relationships in Google+. Starting today, you will see more Google+ posts, Picasa photos and results from other Google products when you do a Google search. Google+ pages will also now feature more prominently on search results pages. This feature is rolling out now. (Google Blog, Search Engine Land)

Kinect for PC launches February 1st: As expected, Kinect is coming to the PC. It will retail for around $250 and is available for pre-order right now. New compared to the Xbox version: near mode for sensing objects as close as 50 centimeters and a dongle to improve "coexistence with other USB peripherals."

Apple gains on Android: New data from NPD group shows that the iPhone made huge gains on Android in October and November 2011. Apple's sales made up 43% of all smartphones sales in the U.S. that month and Android accounted for 47%. That's a massive win for Apple, which only had 26% overall in Q3 and a loss for Android, which reached a new height of 60% in Q3 2011. The December numbers should be interesting. (Business Insider)

Google faces $172,000 fine in Korea for obstructing investigation into its business practices: CNET reports that Google will likely have to pay this fine because it deleted "key files from PCs and asking its employees to telecommute from home, which had the effect of undermining the investigation." Google denies this. The purpose of the investigation was to see if Google limited its rival's access to Android. (CNET)

Ubuntu for TVs: On Sunday, Lenovo announced its first TV and now Ubuntu is trying to get into the game as well. There don't seem to be any working examples, yet, but an Ubuntu-based TV could soon make its debut. (TechCrunch)

Nokia Lumia 900 is coming to AT&T: Nokia officially announced the sleek Lumia 900 LTE Windows Phone today. Specs: a 1.4GHz CPU, 512MB RAM, 8-megapixel camera and a 4.3-inch AMOLED display. This is the first Windows Phone to offer LTE support. Available "in the coming month." No word on price. (The Verge)

A Windows 7 desktop on your iPad: I'm not sure this is really useful, but the streaming gaming service OnLive unveiled a free iPad app at CES on Monday that will provide users with access to a Windows 7 desktop with Microsoft's Word, PowerPoint and Excel, as well as a browser. (OnLive)

Gorilla Glass 2.0 is stronger, allows for thinner displays: Corning's Gorilla Glass is significantly stronger, which allows device makers to produce thinner displays. It's coming to gadgets near you in the next few months. Expect Apple to be one of the first to use it. (CNET)

In Other News

Apple's new CEO Tim Cook made $378 million last year Apple released a proxy statement on Monday, noting that Tim Cook, who became the company's CEO after Steve Jobs' death, got $378 million in total compensation last year. Almost all of it was in the form of stock options. (Business Insider)

Yahoo gears up for bad times: Kara Swisher reports that Yahoo's Q4 results coming later this month will not be pretty. The company also has to fear activist investor Daniel Loeb, says Swisher, who may decide "to wage a proxy fight for control of the company." And the company's board has become "as dysfunctional as the come." Good times. (AllThingsD)

Why MG Siegler hates Android: "I realize that the Android team at Google has a lot of good people doing great work. I know some of them. I respect them. But I cannot respect their decision to continue to work on this platform that perpetuates our imprisonment. I have to believe most simply chose not to think about these things. But they should. They really should."(Parislemon)

An App Worth Trying

Scout.me: TeleNav launched a "personal navigator for smartphones, computers and cars" today. The app is basically a turn-by-turn GPS app, but the cool feature is that it can help you avoid traffic jams by a) telling you when the best time to leave for (or from) work is. Even better, if you own a Ford with support for SYNC AppLink, the app will soon be closely integrated with your car and you can control it either by voice or through the buttons on your steering wheel. Worth a try, even if you don't drive a Ford. (iTunes, press release)

Sign up here:

If you want to sign up for SiliconMorning, just leave your email address in the form below:




8:00 am


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

It's been a very typical Friday in the tech news world, with a relatively slow trickle of news compared to other days. That doesn't mean there was nothing to report, though, as Samsung reported record sales numbers, Yahoo is apparently trying to fix its disfunctional board and Mayor Bloomberg of New York City is apparently trying to learn to code.

Here is our round-up of the most interesting tech news stories of the day.

Top Stories

The next iPhone and iPad will likely have a quad-core chip: An intrepid hacker found some references to a quad-core A6 chip in Apple's code for iOS 5.1. There are already some quad-core Android phones on the market, so Apple will likely follow suit soon. This is not a huge surprise, but expect to hear more about this in the next few days. (9to5Mac, Ars Technica)

Samsung reports record profits: Thanks to its growing smartphone business, Samsung is now the world's largest technology company by sales (something that made Apple apologist John Gruber a bit grumpy). Samsung made about $4.5 billion profit in Q4. (Register, Bloomberg, AFP)

Yahoo is looking to fix its broken board: With a new CEO on board, Yahoo is now looking to fix its dysfunctional board. Rumor has it that Yahoo has hired an executive search firm to replace "possible outgoing directors," according to the Wall Street Journal. Shareholders can start nominating rival directors starting in late February.(WSJ)

SOPA/PIPA

Al Gore joins the chorus of SOPA's opponents: "The content creators and owners have a point and a legitimate complaint… But, in our country, in our world today, there is hardly anything more important — whether you want to solve global warming, as I do, whether you want to reinvigorate democracy as many of us do, whatever problem you want to fix — there is hardly anything more important to getting the right things done than to save and protect the vibrancy and freedom of the internet. The internet is bringing life back to democracy." (Techdirt)

Apple

Apple will open stores-within-a-store outlets inside Target: Apple is about to launch Apple-branded areas within Target stores in the U.S. The company already runs a successful partnership with Best Buy and is apparently looking to expand this. Given how much most people hate Best Buy, it's probably a good idea for Apple to start working with some other companies now. (AppleInsider)

Hacking

Even New York City Mayor Bloomberg will learn to code in 2012: It seems learning to code is all the rage now. NYC Mayor Bloomberg is apparently joining the fray, too, and has joined Codecademy's Code Year program. London's Mayer Boris Johnson is apparently considering to join as well (TPM)

Reminders

So much for all that free music: If you are using Spotify's free service and you signed up when it launched in the U.S., remember that your six month trial period is almost over. Soon, you will be limited to 10 hours per day if you don't sign up for one of Spotify's paid plans. (Business Insider)

Catching Up (1/6) in Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



12:21 am


Catching Up: This Weekend’s Best Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours. On Monday, though, we typically focus on the best stories that were published over the weekend, when you were probably out and about instead of keeping up with the latest news on the Internet.

Today’s Headlines: Automatic Facebook Oversharing, Unnoticed Twitter Ads and Google’s Cultural Institute

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any if the headlines in the embed below. An overlay will then appear and allow you to read the story and easily navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (Weekend 11/19-20) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



4:32 pm


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours. Given that it’s Monday, we also include a number of interesting reads from the weekend in today’s round-up.

Today’s Headlines: Kindle Fire Reviews, Google X and the State of Innovation

As expected, the first reviews of Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablet arrived late last night (with the actual devices shipping to customers today). We added a few of these to our list today. The general tenor is that it’s an impressive tablet for $199, though it can’t rival the iPad in terms of design and ease of use. It also looks as if Amazon had to cut some corners to bring the price down (the Fire doesn’t have physical volume controls, for example).

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any if the headlines in the embed below. An overlay will then appear and allow you to read the story and easily navigate to all the other ones as well.

Best of the Weekend (11/12-13) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



4:24 pm


Catching Up: This Weekend’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Weekends tend to be rather slow when it comes to tech news, but thanks to the launch of Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs, even those sites that usually don’t cover Apple news in detail kept pumping out stories as more and more details from the book leaked before today’s release date. The book, in its various e-Book and hardcover editions currently dominates Amazon’s sales charts, just as it dominated the tech news over the weekend. Having read about a quarter through the book by now, I have to say that it’s definitely worth a read – not just for the insights into Jobs’ life and thoughts, but also because it’s a fascinating history of Silicon Valley and the players that made it what it is today.

Today’s list then mostly focuses on Jobs, but we also found a number of other interesting stories that aren’t directly related to Apple.

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any if the headlines in the embed below. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and easily navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (Weekend 10/22) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



3:44 pm


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

Today’s Headlines: iPhone 4S Sales, the Grim Future of RIM and What Happens When Your Gmail Account Gets Hacked?

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any if the headlines in the embed below. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and easily navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (10/17) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



1:37 am


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

Today’s Headlines: Google Promises “Automagical Results,” iPhone 4s Teardown, Fixing Firefox and the State of Angel Investing

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (10/13) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



11:25 pm


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

Today’s Headlines: Delicious Disasters, Apple vs. Pystar, Project Spartan and Why The NYTimes Won’t Use Facebook’s “Frictionless Sharing”

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (9/29) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



1:51 am


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

New Kindles, 120,000 The Daily Subscribers, Microsoft’s Android Tax, and Music Pirates Who Just Give Up and Use Spotify

The tech news today was dominated just one story: the launch of Amazon’s Android-based $199 Kindle Fire tablet. While most pundits expected the tablet, though, Amazon went a step further and also launched a basic $99 touch-based Kindle ($149 with 3G) and a keyboard-less, non-touch version for only $79 (with Amazon’s “Special Offers” program). Besides all of the new hardware, the Seattle-based company also introduced a new browser for the Kindle Fire. The “Silk” browser offloads a lot of its processing to Amazon’s own EC2 cloud-computing platform to speed things up.

Even though Amazon dominated the news, we found quite a few other interesting stories today as well, ranging from Microsoft’s Android patent deal with Samsung to the revelation that News Corps.’ much-hyped The Daily only has about 120,000 weekly users. Today’s list also features a story about Spotify’s effect on piracy, how military drones are learning to recognize people and an inside look at how things are going with Google+.

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (9/28) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



12:38 am


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting and thought-provoking tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

iPhone 5, Kindle Tablet, Delicious and the Disconnected Niche

Today’s list features some straight-up news stories about the re-launch of Web 2.0 icon Delicious about the confirmation that Apple will announce the new iPhone next week, but also some more in-depth pieces about topics like the future of the printed book (in the context of tomorrow’s Amazon event) and a short piece about the growing number of users who choose to disconnect themselves from the big social networks and online tracking mechanisms.

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (9/27) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



11:17 pm


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

This is shaping up to be a very busy week in the tech world (and with Facebook’s F8 conference tomorrow, things aren’t likely to slow down anytime soon). Today’s list is dominated by the U.S. Senate’s anti-trust hearing into Google’s practices. Other stories in our round-up today include a look at how Facebook’s users are reacting the latest updates, an essay about open hardware and a profile of Sean Parker’s that includes a look at his next venture.

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (9/21) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



1:52 am


Catching Up: Today’s Must-Read Tech Stories

/

Every day, we compile a list with the most interesting tech stories published over the last 24 hours.

Today’s list features a motley mix of topics, including a look at Google’s new electronic wallet, an interview with Michael Dell – who doesn’t think the PC business is dead – a survey that looks at how U.S. adults use text messaging and, of course, some punditry about Netflix’s surprising decision to split itself into two.

To read these stories (which we curate with the help of Pearltress), just click on any headline in the embed below that sounds interesting. An overlay will then pop up and allow you to read the story and navigate to all the other ones as well.

Catching Up (9/19) in Best / Frederic Lardinois (fredericl)



11:23 pm