Google

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Google just announced that it plans to fade out support for the widely used H.264 codec from its Chrome browser "in the next few months". Instead, Google will favor the open Theora video codec and its own open WebM (VP8) codec.

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Goo.gl, Google's fast URL shortener, just got an API that will make it easier for developers to add it to their own applications. Goo.gl launched as a feature for Google's own apps in December 2009, but only went public as a more direct competitor to URL shorteners like bit.ly in late September 2010. At that time, Google didn't offer...

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Google Goggles is one of the most fascinating products to come out of Google's labs for quite some time and the company continues to improve the product regularly. Today, Google is introducing a major update Goggles which features improved barcode scanning and the ability to take pictures of ads in magazines and get search results about the product and...

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It's been just about a week since Google's Cr-48 prototype ChromeOS netbook appeared on my doorstep. Since then, I've been putting it through its paces, including during a short trip to a press event in Detroit, and it's turned out to be a surprisingly useful machine.

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If you own an Android phone with the latest Android 2.2 Froyo update, you can now use your voice to control almost all of the most often used features of the phone. With Voice Actions for Android, users can use voice commands to perform actions like sending text messages (" "send text to Allison Miller Running late. I will be home around 9"), play specific songs from their music collection ("listen to the New Pornographers"), go to websites, send email, write a note, search Google and view a map and get directions.

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Google just announced that it has stopped development of its real-time collaboration and communication platform Google Wave. Wave, according to Google’s Urs Holzle, “has not seen the user adoption would have liked.” The parts of the code that Google already offered as open source code will remain available, but Wave as a standalone product will cease to exist...

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YouTube just announced that it will soon support 4k video - the next-generation HD format with a resolution of 4096x3072 pixels. At almost four times the size of 1080p, the highest resolution HD format currently available in the mainstream market, YouTube's resolution for 4K videos goes far beyond what most people will be able to watch on their TVs and computers for quite a while to come.