SiliconFilter

Beyond the Check-In Hype: Unmotivated Users [Infographic]

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Silicon Valley often falls in love with ideas that work great for geeks, early adopters and Robert Scoble. These ideas, however, often leave mainstream users cold. Check-in-based location sharing services like Foursquare, Gowalla and Co. are one of the most recent examples of this. The good folks behind the Social-Loco conference (which incidentally starts tomorrow) teamed up with digital agency Beyond to take a closer look at what could motivate consumers to start using these products. Today, according to these companies’ research, almost 50% of those who currently don’t use check-in apps simply have no motivation for doing so.

So what would motivate these users? According to this study then, if location-based services really want to get new users onto their services, they will have to focus on coupons for restaurants and cafes, or give users info about homes that are for sale in their area and tourist info about cities they visit. While most check-in apps focus on making it easier for users to find friends, the majority of mainstream consumers is not interested in this. Only 12% would be motivated to use a check-in app for this. Looking a bit deeper, it’s also worth noting that mainstream consumers are more likely to use Facebook Places, Groupon and Twitter (55%, 40% and 20% respectively) than Foursquare and its startup brethren.

Virtual Badges and Becoming Mayor? Mainstream Users Don’t Care

It’s interesting that all these features that non-users say would motivate them to check in are already available in numerous products. Maybe, at the end of the day, checking in is simply too much of a hassle and maybe getting a coupon somewhere just isn’t worth the trouble for most people. Only 1% of mainstream users, by the way, said getting a virtual badge or becoming “mayor” would motivate them. Geek? 21%.

Note: click image for high-resolution version



1:17 pm



How Airlines Use Twitter [Infographic]

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Virtually every major airline has a presence on Twitter today. But how active are these businesses on Twitter? Well, compared to the millions of people who get on planes every day, the activity on most airline Twitter accounts is rather low. Delta Airline’s @deltaassist is currently the most active account with about 64 daily tweets. Not every airline even gets close to this kind of activity, though. Customers tweet an average of 164 messages that were directed at the United Airlines @UnitedAirlines account, but United only sends out an average of 3.3 tweets per day (data courtesy of Penn Olson).

Our friends at Travel 2.0 took a closer look at this data and created a nifty little infographic based on it:

How Airlines Use Twitter



11:51 am


Email and Romance at Work [Infographic]

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Valentine’s day – everybody’s favorite Hallmark holiday – is just around the corner and as every year, you ignore it at your own peril. To mark this year’s February the 14th, the good folks over at Microsoft put a little infographic together that looks at the current state of work email as a conduit for office romance.

Here are some of the highlights:

– 69 percent of American adults admit to sharing romantic words, photos and even fantasies via e-mail.
– 55 percent save emails from their romantic partner while 31 percent save emails from their ex-partner
– 25 percent have been caught sending sexy emails at work
– 4 percent have sent sexy emails at work and admitted to ACTING them out at work!

Hotmail work romance



2:57 pm


Afraid the Government is Spying on You Online? You're Not Alone [Infographic]

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Today is Data Privacy Day and the good folks at Opera used this as a chance to commission a survey of 1,000 web users each in the U.S., Japan and Russia and ask them about how worried they are about online privacy.

In the U.S. – far more so than in Russia and Japan – Internet users tend to think that the government has too much insight into their online behavior (35%). Surprisingly, only 9% are worried about what search engines know about them (guess most people never check their Web History page on Google) and 5% think shopping sites are the worst offenders here. When it comes to social networking sites, 15% of U.S. Internet users and a whopping 38% of Russians think these sites know too much about them.

In the U.S., the majority of users (54%) also feel that they themselves are responsible for their online safety and privacy. About a quarter of U.S. Internet users thinks the ISPs and other companies operating on the web should ensure their privacy and 10% think the government should be in charge.

To protect themselves, most use antivirus software (80%) and safe passwords. Interestingly, 47% say that they regularly delete their surfing history to ensure their online privacy, which generally doesn’t do much good when it comes to being tracked online.

Around 15% of U.S. Internet users also claims to just use sites and software that does not collect information. We can only assume that these users just use DuckDuckGo as their search engine and have never encountered a cookie online…



11:26 am


Decoding Your Credit Card Number [Infographic]

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Living in the U.S. without a credit card is close to impossible and most of us probably carry more than one card around with us at all times. But what do you actually know about your card? The good folks over at Mint.com put together a nice little infographic that explains what those numbers on your card really mean.

In case you thought these numbers were random, think again. And if you need a quick math challenge while you are checking out at the supermarket, the infographic also teaches you a little trick to see if your card is valid.

(more…)



4:14 pm