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Until now, users of the hosted WordPress.com service didn't really have an option to monetize their ads. Now, thanks to a partnership with online advertising company Federated Media, WordPress.com bloggers will be able to run ads on their sites.

Automattic’s popular blogging service WordPress.com just gained some new features that make it easier for its users to customize their sites. For $30 per year, WordPress.com users can now personalize their blogs with a wide selection of fonts from Typekit and those who feel comfortable with digging into the intricacies of cascading style sheets now get access to a...

WordPress wants to bring the worlds of WordPress.com and WordPress.org closer together. Automattic’s WordPress.com, the popular blog hosting service, is also the company behind the open-source WordPress software for hosting blogs on your own server. While most of the features Automattic introduces to WordPress.com eventually make it to the self-hosted version, some rely on being hosted on the WordPress.com...

If you run a WordPress site, chances are you are using some kind of plugin to reformat your design for mobile devices. One of the most popular plugins for doing so is WPtouch from BraveNewCode. The tool is available in a somewhat limited free version and a paid pro version ($39). Until now, though, WPtouch only supported mobile phones...

As I'm thinking about the sale of TechCrunch to AOL and Jason Calacanis' ideas for how to take tech reporting to the next level (in the form of an email newsletter), I can't help but think about what the next generation of tech blogs will look like. Since the early days of tech blogging, the field has become more professionalized and the major blogs now have plenty of full- and half-time staffers who ensure that no nuance of the tech world goes uncovered. While Twitter and Facebook have changed the way these publications find readers for their stories (in the early days, RSS feeds used to be a huge source of traffic), the blogs themselves all still look pretty much the same (one exception - at least with regards to their homepage, is the rapidly expanding The Next Web).