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To buy a Kindle book and read it on your iOS device, you can't use an in-app bookstore. Instead, you have to go to Amazon's website to buy your book. The same holds true for virtually every other iOS e-book reader. Yesterday, however, Apple rejected Sony's e-reader app for the iPhone, arguing that apps that offer users to buy content outside of the app also have to make their virtual goods available through in-app purchases (read: purchases that allow Apple to take its 30% cut)

There is a scandal brewing in the tech world this morning that has the potential to greatly tarnish the reputation of Bing, Microsoft's Google-challenger. According to Search Engine Land's Danny Sullivan, Google thinks that Microsoft is copying some of its search results. That's about as serious an allegation as there can be in the search engine world. In an early statement, Stefan Weitz, Microsoft's director of Bing does not deny this, but notes that Bing uses "multiple signals and approaches" when thinking about ranking.

Arc90s Readability bookmarklet has long been a staple of my online experience. Once installed, the Readability bookmarklet allows you to see a beautifully typeset, pure text view of any article you are looking at. The service wipes away all the distractions from the site - but for publishers, that can also make it harder to monetize traffic. Today, Arc90 launched a new version of Readability that goes far beyond its earliest incarnation. This new version introduces Instapaper-like reading lists and a micropayment system that pays publishers based on how often its users used the tool on their sites.

I guess it was only a matter of time. Yesterday, I wrote about Noor, the last Egyptian ISP that was still working, despite the government ordering all other ISPs to shut down. Now, Egypt's last conduit to the Internet has been shut down as well.

Google Docs just announced a user interface overhaul of its documents list. This new interface makes it much easier to organize and find the documents you upload to Google Docs. Google introduced a set of filters that now allow you to organize your files by type, visibility state (whether you shared it online, with friends, etc.), last modified date and, of course, by name.

For all intents and purposes, Egypt is currently cut off from the Internet. Even today, though, the Noor Group's DSL service in Egype remains available (though it experienced some downtime earlier today). Why is Noor, which has about an 8% market share in Egypt, allowed to continue to operate while the rest of the country's ISPs went dark days ago?

Today is Data Privacy Day and the good folks at Opera used this as a chance to commission a survey of 1,000 web uers each in the U.S., Japan and Russia and ask them about how worried they are about online privacy.

Google just announced that Google Earth now features high-quality 3D-models of virtually all the California Bay Area, including the city of San Francisco, Google's hometown of Mountain View, Palo Alto, Oakland, Redwood City, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, and Sunnyvale. To see this expanded 3D coverage, you will need to turn on "3D Buildings" in Google Earth.

A few weeks ago, I wrote that your next car might just have its own IP address. Besides talking to the Internet, though, there is also a lot of utility in using short-range networks that can link multiple cars together into a single, ad-hoc network and alert drivers of potential hazards. Today, Ford announced a new initiative that will...

In 2009, Google launched real estate listings as one of the search options in Google Maps. Apparently, this was not a major hit, as the company today announced that it is retiring this feature because of "low usage" and "the proliferation of excellent property-search tools on real estate websites."

About two years ago, Google launched a browser plugin that allowed users to opt out of the company's ads tracking mechanism. By tracking your moves around the Internet, Google - and most other advertising companies - can ensure that you see relevant ads (read: ads you are likely to click) on the pages you visit. Today, just a few hours after Mozilla announced its plan to offer a do-not-track tool for Firefox, Google announced a new Chrome plugin that allows users to permanently opt-out of personalized ads and data tracking from not just Google, but a wide range of other online advertising companies as well.

The good folks over at ClickZ just posted a story with the following headline: "Google's Version of Groupon is Live: How it Works." Problem is, that is simply not true. The image in the article - reproduced below - is from the Google Places interface which has allowed vendors to offer coupons for a long time now (since around 2008, if I remember it right). This tab used to be called "Coupons" at one point in the past.

For a while now, one of the most persistent memes in the tech world is that Google is suffering from a major spam problem and that the quality of its search results have suffered greatly from this. Google today took its critics head-on in a post on its official blog. According to Google's Matt Cutts - the face of...

Usually, when we talk about plugins that crash our browsers, chances are that we are talking about Flash. Today, however, Mozilla announced that it is blocking the Skype Toolbar from its Firefox browser as it "is one of the top crashers of Mozilla Firefox 3.6.13, and was involved in almost 40,000 crashes of Firefox last week." The Skype toolbar examines every page you load for phone numbers and then re-renders these as clickable Skype buttons that enable users to initiate Skype calls right from their browser.

These days, you don't really have to ask kids to get off your lawn. Chances are, they have no interest in being on your lawn anyway and are playing computer games instead of wreaking havoc on your manicured lawn. According to a new study by Internet security firm AVG, today's kids are learning computer skills long before they are learning life skills.