SiliconFilter

Your Google Docs are Now Ready for Takeout

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It seems like most of the news coming out of Google these days is somewhat controversial, but here is a nice little piece of good news out of Mountain View: you can now easily download an archive of your documents in Google Docs with just a few clicks. Docs, Google announced today, is now part of the Google Takeout service, which allows you to download all of your data from services like Buzz, Picasa, Google Voice and others.

You could, of course, always download your documents from Google Docs already, but this new feature will make it easier for users who want to quickly create a complete backup of their data or move to a different service.

One nifty feature here is that Takeout also allows you to choose which format you want your data to be exported in (Microsoft Office, OpenDocument, PDF, plain text etc.). The downloads themselves are always compressed as ZIP files.

Google Takeout docs



12:49 pm


Adobe Launches Online PDF to Word Converter

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Do you ever find yourself in a situation where you want to edit a PDF document but don’t have the tool to convert it into an editable format like Microsoft Word? Adobe just launched a new online tool for converting PDF documents to Word. ExportPDF costs $19.99 per year and is meant to let you easily convert any PDF without security restrictions into a Word document. The tool is the counterpart of Adobe’s CreatePDF service ($9.99 per month), which – as the name implies – allows you to convert Word documents to PDF.

Of course, there are also plenty of other third-party options for converting PDF documents to Word. One service that has worked especially well for me is nitro software’s free PDFtoWord,com, which will email you the converted document (.doc or .rtf). Another option, of course, is to use Adobe’s own PDF authoring tool Acrobat X, but at $450, that’s probably overkill if you just want to convert a few documents.

That said, though, ExportPDF does offer a few features that may persuade some users to pay. It does convert documents into the modern .docx Word format, for example, which should provide a Word document that’s closer to the original PDF. Adobe also promises to preserve all tables, images, multicolumn texts, as well as page, paragraph and font attributes. Sadly, you can’t give the service a try without paying, though, which will like dissuade quite a few potential users.



6:49 pm