According to a cryptic message on the even more cryptic demoslam.com, a site that looks to be a Google property, "technology is awesome. Learning about it isn't. Until now." Starting on Wednesday, the text on this teaser site reads, you can come to the site to watch demos , "choose your favorites and most importantly, show the world what...

Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg just told a group of aspiring entrepreneurs at Y Combinator's Startup School that he expects to invest most of the money Facebook is currently making back into the business. According to him, it currently "doesn't make sense to make a massive profit," as Facebook is already able to provide the necessary incentives to keep and motivate its employees.

Should Albums Cost $1.50? | Fast Company.

Until today, the New York Times' Editors' Choice iPad app only offered access to a limited number of articles. Now, however, a full-blown NYTimes app has replaced this limited app. The new app offers access to all of the paper's articles, including the weekend magazine and some of the NYTimes' blogs. To get full access to the content, users do need an NYTimes.com account, however. Unregistered users will only be able to see a limited selection of articles , including the top news stories, most emailed stories, business news and a small selection of videos.

As I'm thinking about the sale of TechCrunch to AOL and Jason Calacanis' ideas for how to take tech reporting to the next level (in the form of an email newsletter), I can't help but think about what the next generation of tech blogs will look like. Since the early days of tech blogging, the field has become more professionalized and the major blogs now have plenty of full- and half-time staffers who ensure that no nuance of the tech world goes uncovered. While Twitter and Facebook have changed the way these publications find readers for their stories (in the early days, RSS feeds used to be a huge source of traffic), the blogs themselves all still look pretty much the same (one exception - at least with regards to their homepage, is the rapidly expanding The Next Web).

A new Zogby poll commissioned by the kids-focused online advocacy group Common Sense Media challenges the idea that kids today don't care about online privacy. While some pundits believe that teens care very little about online privacy, the report suggests that teens are quite aware that social networks and search engines track their online behavior. I do have some...

According to the Guardian, serial entrepreneur Jason Calacanis plans to launch a new tech blog in early 2011. With this project, Calacanis is going into direct competition with TechCrunch, the influential Silicon Valley-based blog run by Calacanis's old nemesis Mike Arrington. According to the report, Calacanis plans to hire a small number of editors (possibly four). These writers will have to be free them to research stories deeply and will only have to file one story per week. Calacanis will also host a new startup conference that will challenge TechCrunch's highly successful Disrupt conference.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhtgsAXmz7U&fs=1&hl=en_US&rel=0] YouTube - Worlds Scariest Job. And some people do this for fun... [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GPWkbLVw04&w=580&h=465]

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRsGyueVLvQ&fs=1&hl=en_US&rel=0] YouTube - Sintel. More information at Sintel.org. You can find an interview with the producer here.

After a few hours of wild speculation, TechCrunch founder and co-edit Mike Arrington and AOL CEO Tim Armstrong just announced that AOL has indeed acquired TechCrunch. According to Arrington, TechCrunch will be a fully owned subsidiary of AOL, but his team will have no "editorial boundaries" and AOL will allow the blog to operate as usual. Arrington will stay...

According to Om Malik and the Wall Street Journal, AOL is in the process of acquiring TechCrunch, arguably the world's foremost technology blog. For the time being, this is only a rumor, but with sources like GigaOm and the WSJ, it sure feels like a very sold rumor. It's worth noting, though, this is not the first time we've heard about a possible sale of TechCrunch and none of the other possible sales ever worked out.

Apple just released a new version of iTunes for Mac and PC that makes some much-needed changes to how the company integrates its social network Ping into the application. Until now, not only was Ping somewhat hidden in iTunes, but you could also only really interact with it from within the iTunes store and not from within your iTunes library. Unless your friends are compulsive music shoppers, chances are that few of them ever went through the store to mark their favorite songs. Now, however, in the new version of iTunes (10.0.1), you can very easily like songs right from within your music library and you can choose to see a sidebar with the latest activity from your Ping friends while browsing your library. Chances are that this will raise the activity level on Ping, though it remains to be seen if this will be a dramatic change.

Whenever I hear people discussing Microsoft, it usually doesn't take long before somebody mentions that the Redmond-based giant is like a huge oil tanker. It takes a while to turn such a huge company around and get it back on track. When Microsoft stumbled after the dotcom boom and couldn't even produce a viable browser to compete with the open-source offerings of Mozilla, quite a few pundits assumed that the age of Microsoft was about to come to an end (the less said about the disaster that was Windows Vista, the better).

Our RWW post about the new Digg just hit the Digg front page - and the comments are anything but friendly. Here are a few choice examples.

Works just as advertised, but here are a few observations: the new phone icon is inconspicuously placed in the "Chat" box - if Google didn't point it out so clearly when the feature is activated, you could almost miss it Gmail doesn't auto-recognize phone-numbers and so you can't just click on a number in an email and initiate a call if your...